halting

From Academic to Fan The current political climate makes reading classic (i.e. Marston-era) Wonder Woman feel more relevant. To be honest, reading Marston-era Wonder Woman is tough for me. The stories share a formulaic structure and repeat the same themes: Wonder Woman saves America from the Axis of Evil and along the way encounters Steve Trevor so he can remind us that Wonder Woman is beautiful and an object of desire. I feel a much more immediately attached to the Wonder Woman of Azzarello and Chiang’s work and the Wonder Woman of Finch and Finch. Modern Wonder Woman is slicker, more direct, and more complex.Read More →

Calvin and Hobbes sledding

The internet has given us a great many things since its advent. Videos of furry animals, convenient online shopping mediums, and plenty of games that produce enough salt to stock the shelves of every major and minor grocer this side of the prime meridian. However, the medium of comic books and stories has flourished since we first connected to the information superhighway, spawning countless tales and ‘toons that have persisted for several years thanks to adoring fanbases. For some of these long-running works, it’s a sense of humor or endearing characters or engaging storyline that fastens its claws into readers. For others, it’s a realismRead More →

why

Recently I attended an event with Ph.D.s from around the country. As we shared our research interests I said, “Wonder Woman.” Some snickered. Some nodded. Some turned away. Wonder Woman? How is that a research interest? Some of them share my enthusiasm and ask me questions including, “Why doesn’t she ever get her own movie!?” To which I must awkwardly reply, “She did. It came out two months ago…” Fast forward five days where I stood in a comic shop behind a stack of Wonder Woman issues that I could barely see over. I rent a subscription from the man behind the counter, and IRead More →

america

Wonder Woman in America & Abroad Wonder Woman has been a hit of the early summer and while she has met with challenges in other countries, she has been America’s darling (again) for the last month. Wonder Woman has always had great popularity in the United States. She was created here, and her comics and stories are widely read here. Her creator, William Moulton Marston, created her to save America. In “The Origin of Wonder Woman” Athena tells Queen of the Amazons, Queen Hippolyte that, “American liberty and freedom must be preserved. … America, the last citadel of democracy, and of equal rights for women,Read More →

transformations

Please welcome to the site our newest ambassador, Katherine Olson. Katherine holds a Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Studies from Union Institute & University. She is currently interested in Wonder Woman, feminism, and culture. For The Geek Embassy, she will be writing about comics, looking especially at the Amazon princess and other powerful female characters. Please welcome her to the site and enjoy this glimpse into her transformations through comic book narrative. ~Regina Transformations: From Betty and Veronica to Wonder Woman I grew up in a Betty and Veronica world. The convenience store near the housing projects where I lived stocked only Archie comics, so I read them. EvenRead More →

Deadpool

Not Another Top-Ten List You can blame Facebook for this one.  My friends and I had a lively Facebook discussion about Hugh Jackman, which, subsequently inspired this post.  The recent release of Logan got me all nostalgic, thinking back on his universally-lauded performances as Wolverine for the last 17 years.  My immediate reaction was to declare Jackman’s performances as the truest representation of a comic book character in film.  But then people starting challenging me.  What about RDJ?  Ryan Reynolds?  Chris Evans? Comic book movies have produced some brilliant performances over the years.  Who is truly the best at bringing a character from page to screen?Read More →

ruin comics

In reality, I’m sure that the Internet ruined comics long before now but this past week was my personal tipping point. In case you’re unaware, these past two weeks were not particularly great for women in comics.  The Riri Williams variant cover controversy was bad enough.  Then the Mockingbird #8 cover controversy made the Riri scandal look tame by comparison.  It’s Comic-Ghazi. Let’s start with Riri.  On the Jeff Dekal variant cover of Invincible Iron Man #1 Riri looks like a normal human.  The much-maligned J. Scott Campbell variant cover features Riri doing her best impression of Simone Biles in a skintight, low-cut clothing.  Why isRead More →

comic book lingo

Letterer and Inker, Colorist and Artist? What do all these comic book people do and why does it take so many? This is Part 3 in a crash course on comic book lingo that will help you navigate the comic book store and that pile of old comics in the garage.Read More →

sandra glahn guest post

Recently at the grad school where I teach, I attended a prospective-student event in which the faculty introduced ourselves by including not where we got our Ph.D.s, but by something much more important: our favorite cartoon characters. The first words out of my mouth were “Wonder Woman,” whose history veiled in mystery Smithsonian Magazine disclosed  in their November 2014 issue.   I’ve read some great stories in comics, and I received my Ph.D. in no small part due to them. One-third of my comps related to literature. So I reviewed major plots and characters for my oral exams by borrowing and reading Classic Comics (aRead More →