golden age

In December 1942 Wonder Woman was asked to star in a feature film. Initially, she suggests hiring an actress to play her part. But after hearing that Steve Trevor would be in Los Angeles she changes her mind. (Note: This contradicts previous stories where Wonder Woman is uninterested in Trevor. However, her alter-ego Diana Prince is in love with him). Interestingly, she insists on two conditions. First, Diana Prince must be sent along as her secretary and second that Etta Candy and her girls must have roles in the movie. This story has all of the classic Golden Age elements: bondage, hidden identities, and Baroness PaulaRead More →

Jack Nicholson as Jack Torrance in The Shining

When I was younger, I liked to read. Scratch that, I loved to read. If I found a book I loved or a story I adored, I wouldn’t put it down. Seriously, bookworms know of the learned skill of successfully navigating crowded hallways and classrooms with your nose stuck between pages. (Books are great, kids. Support your local library.) Recently, though, I’ve rediscovered audiobooks. Since I have little time and attention span to physically carry a book with me, this seemed ideal. It was a flashback to the days in school, walking the halls and following the adventures of Martin the Warrior or the BaudelaireRead More →

Astral

The Golden Age of Wonder Woman One of the most fascinating elements of Golden Age Wonder Woman are the tools available to her. “Mission to Planet Eros” introduces the reader to a number of fascinating tools that haven’t been mentioned before (Marston 1). The story opens with Diana Prince dressing for work by putting on earrings. She notes, “When I visited Venus for the Justice Society, Queen Desira magnetized these earrings with her lips. […] She said the earrings would give me magnetic hearing, and she could speak to me from Venus. I have a feeling she’s trying to contact me now—oh—my ears are tingling!”Read More →

Not Another New Year’s Resolution Post New Year’s Resolutions are a tried and trite trope.  When our planet returns to its arbitrarily determined starting point in its orbit around the sun we decide to start anew and resolve to do things that we quit, failed, or forgot to do in the past year.  New years symbolically have a tether in our brains to new beginnings, and I hate it.  I hate it because it’s trite and phony since we all try to do things that we hate doing.  Stop me if you heard these before. Pay my credit card bill on time Join a gymRead More →

celebrating

Celebrating Year One To celebrate Wonder Woman’s first year of publication, creator William Moulton Marston spins a tail that draws Diana Prince, Wonder Woman, and Steve Trevor back together. Only the love triangle between these three is transformed into a love square involving Dolly Dancer, a young woman Diana trails Steve to meet at the Bohemian Club (Moulton 59). When Diana lays eyes on the girl she notes “She isn’t as pretty as Wonder Woman. I wonder what Steve sees in her” (Moulton 59). This is the natural response when one follows the man she is interested in meet another woman, right? Well… No. TheRead More →

principle

Darwyn Cooke’s (with Dave Stewart) DC: The New Frontier introduces us to a new incarnation of Wonder Woman. In Chapter 4: Gods and Monsters, we see a newspaper story written by Clark Kent. The article, “Superman and Wonder Woman Ease Suffering for Indo-China” is accompanied by a photograph of Wonder Woman holding a girl waving a flag on her back (Cooke 80). The photograph is captioned, “Wonder Woman: WInning the hearts and minds of the disenfranchised” (Cooke 80). Importantly, the article tells us that “This administration would like to stress that their mission is humanitarian, not military, in nature.” We follow Superman through a battlefieldRead More →

Diana

Wonder Woman isn’t a character. Wonder Woman is a role that different characters take. This complicates discussions and understanding of Wonder Woman because that title doesn’t always refer to daughter of Hippolyte, Diana, Princess of the Amazons. Others have been Wonder Woman, and other Wonder Women exist in the multiverse. Diana Who? At some level, this must have been Charles Moulton Marston’s intent when he created the character. In “Introducing Wonder Woman” Hippolyte tells her daughter, “We are indeed a race of Wonder Women!” (Marston 6). This assertion is asserted by a number of Wonder Woman stories in which other Amazons including Hippolyte and ArtemisRead More →

storm front

Welcome to the first episode in our new series, The Geek Embassy Reads! This series is the official book club for the site. We will read a book and then come together to share our thoughts about it. Storm Front For the first installment, we read Storm Front by Jim Butcher. This is the first installment of The Dresden Files series. From the Amazon description: For Harry Dresden—Chicago’s only professional wizard—business, to put it mildly, stinks. So when the police bring him in to consult on a grisly double murder committed with black magic, Harry’s seeing dollar signs. But where there’s black magic, there’s aRead More →

weld

When it comes to Golden Age Wonder Woman, people have devoted a great deal of attention to creator William Moulton Marston’s unconventional lifestyle and his beliefs. A lot of that attention is paid to the number of scenes in which Wonder Woman is tied up and must escape. Bondage is certainly a primary source of punishment in the early comics. It is also the source of one of Wonder Woman’s costume elements—her bracelets. One of Marston’s partners, Olive Byrne (famously the niece of birth control advocate Margaret Sanger) inspired Wonder Woman’s bracelets: “The heavy bracelets she wore, so like Wonder Woman’s “bracelets of submission […]”Read More →

bitter root

Bitter Root, a new comic series announced by Image Comics at Rose City Comic Con, promises an innovative approach to storytelling and social commentary. The story takes place in New York City during the Harlem Renaissance. It combines a monster hunting family with history and historical figures. Creators David Walker, Chuck Brown, and Sanford Greene collaborated before on Iron Fist for Marvel Comics and come together to produce this dream project. To Cure or Kill? The story follows the Sangerye Family of “purifiers” who have an ancient magic able to cure monsters of their infection. The family falls into a civil war with lines drawn between thoseRead More →