With the passing of Inktober, where online artists commit themselves to make and publish daily drawings, comes the beginning of NaNoWriMo. NaNoWriMo, National Novel Writing Month, is the writer’s equivalent to Inktober, where daily writing and review culminate in a fully realized novel. Titles like “The Night Circus” and “Water for Elephants” were penned during NaNo, which led to worldwide acclaim for their authors. Other stories, often overlooked, are still great reads and a testament to the dedication of writers worldwide. I’ve attempted to work through NaNo, taking stories I had pieced together beforehand and building on them. But between scheduling, exhaustion, school (at theRead More →

principle

Darwyn Cooke’s (with Dave Stewart) DC: The New Frontier introduces us to a new incarnation of Wonder Woman. In Chapter 4: Gods and Monsters, we see a newspaper story written by Clark Kent. The article, “Superman and Wonder Woman Ease Suffering for Indo-China” is accompanied by a photograph of Wonder Woman holding a girl waving a flag on her back (Cooke 80). The photograph is captioned, “Wonder Woman: WInning the hearts and minds of the disenfranchised” (Cooke 80). Importantly, the article tells us that “This administration would like to stress that their mission is humanitarian, not military, in nature.” We follow Superman through a battlefieldRead More →

Halloween

Greetings, ladies, gentlemen, and others. A bit of a departure this week from my usual ramblings, in celebration of my favorite holiday: All Hallow’s Eve. Instead of a written piece, The Geek Embassy has granted me the opportunity to present a dramatic reading of a piece penned by one of the great masters of modern ethereal horror: H. P. Lovecraft, and his short story, The Outsider. I will be the first to express bias towards this tale, as it imitates the voice of another famed horror writer, Edgar Allan Poe, a personal favorite of mine. And it is true, Lovecraft is the mind behind Cthulhu, one of theRead More →

Diana

Wonder Woman isn’t a character. Wonder Woman is a role that different characters take. This complicates discussions and understanding of Wonder Woman because that title doesn’t always refer to daughter of Hippolyte, Diana, Princess of the Amazons. Others have been Wonder Woman, and other Wonder Women exist in the multiverse. Diana Who? At some level, this must have been Charles Moulton Marston’s intent when he created the character. In “Introducing Wonder Woman” Hippolyte tells her daughter, “We are indeed a race of Wonder Women!” (Marston 6). This assertion is asserted by a number of Wonder Woman stories in which other Amazons including Hippolyte and ArtemisRead More →

storm front

Welcome to the first episode in our new series, The Geek Embassy Reads! This series is the official book club for the site. We will read a book and then come together to share our thoughts about it. Storm Front For the first installment, we read Storm Front by Jim Butcher. This is the first installment of The Dresden Files series. From the Amazon description: For Harry Dresden—Chicago’s only professional wizard—business, to put it mildly, stinks. So when the police bring him in to consult on a grisly double murder committed with black magic, Harry’s seeing dollar signs. But where there’s black magic, there’s aRead More →

weld

When it comes to Golden Age Wonder Woman, people have devoted a great deal of attention to creator William Moulton Marston’s unconventional lifestyle and his beliefs. A lot of that attention is paid to the number of scenes in which Wonder Woman is tied up and must escape. Bondage is certainly a primary source of punishment in the early comics. It is also the source of one of Wonder Woman’s costume elements—her bracelets. One of Marston’s partners, Olive Byrne (famously the niece of birth control advocate Margaret Sanger) inspired Wonder Woman’s bracelets: “The heavy bracelets she wore, so like Wonder Woman’s “bracelets of submission […]”Read More →

baskets

Greetings Geeks! Today, I have a recording of our recent panel at Rose City Comic Con for your listening and geeking out pleasure. This is the third time we have presented this topic but each time is different, largely because we depend so much on audience participation. Because come on. The best panels let YOU speak. Am I right or am I right? RCCC Audiences Rock The audience at RCCC was engaged and engaging. They knew a lot about fairy tales from the very start of the panel which is  not how it has gone for us in the past. Usually, I pose the questionRead More →

bitter root

Bitter Root, a new comic series announced by Image Comics at Rose City Comic Con, promises an innovative approach to storytelling and social commentary. The story takes place in New York City during the Harlem Renaissance. It combines a monster hunting family with history and historical figures. Creators David Walker, Chuck Brown, and Sanford Greene collaborated before on Iron Fist for Marvel Comics and come together to produce this dream project. To Cure or Kill? The story follows the Sangerye Family of “purifiers” who have an ancient magic able to cure monsters of their infection. The family falls into a civil war with lines drawn between thoseRead More →

motor crush

Motor Crush Rush Recently, I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing three comic book hotshots at Rose City Comic Con. Fortune favored me and I got a chance to talk to Brenden Fletcher, Cameron Stewart, And Babs Tarr about their latest offering from Image Comics: Motor Crush. When I went through the list of books available for interview, Motor Crush raced to the top because the premise seemed so unique and inherently feminist. Domino Swift is a woman of color competing in the dangerous world of moto racing. She lives her life perched between the official racing world, and dangerous street racing where she competesRead More →

marston

After my last post, people may have the impression that I don’t appreciate Marston-era Wonder Woman, and I want to be sure that is cleared up. I appreciate Marston’s creation. I appreciate the complexity that he gave the character from the moment he created her. A simpler character most likely would not have endured 75 years and multiple writers and incarnations. I also appreciate that the fundamental principles (including compassion, seeking justice, and pursuing peace) present in her founding exist today. Certainly Marston’s stories rely on some elements that, through repetition, are the core of Wonder Woman, and without these she would be a differentRead More →